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Capt. Laurent Gourley...8-6-69

Capt. Laurent Gourley...8-6-69

Hi Everyone,

I lost it today.

It is Sunday, the day after the Laurel, Maryland Power Therapies Conference, and Deborah Mitnick (one of our first class practitioners) was kind enough to drive me into Washington, D.C. to see the "Vietnam Wall."

I first saw it three years ago on a business trip to Washington, D.C. and lost it then, too. Powerful experience. A long wall on which the names of Vietnam war casualties are engraved. Many people walking by. Silence. Respect. Reverence. People running their fingers over the engraved names of their loved ones--their brothers, husbands, fathers, sons.

Flowers were laid at the base of the wall under certain names. A wreath was placed nearby with the name of a battalion on it. The wreath evidenced love within war, comradeship within conflict. At the foot of the wall was a clear baggie containing a metal bracelet. Someone--a loved one--placed it there. I picked it up and looked at it. On it was engraved...

Capt. Laurent Gourley....8-6-69.

What a heart tug.

I didn't know Capt. Laurent Gourley but I know many just like him. I speak here of the PTSD ridden vets at the Veterans Administration that Adrienne and I visited in 1994 (20 altogether--only 6 agreed to be filmed). These men were in the war and "survived." They weren't officers, like Capt. Gourley. They were enlisted men. They called themselves "ground pounders."

I saw this wall. I saw the wreath. I saw Capt. Laurent Gourley's bracelet. And lost it. I went to one side, put my head down on a post and cried. I tapped a little but stopped because I preferred to cry. I don't know why I preferred to cry. I just did. It was somehow necessary. Part of my tears involved remembering the touching moments Adrienne and I had with our vets--Rich, Robert, Anthony, Philip, Gary, Ralph and many others. Their nightmares, intrusive memories, headaches, PTSD and other pains occupied their lives constantly. Despite this, they were loving men. They loved each other dearly. They "understood" a level of camaraderie that most of us only talk about. Most of them were scared. Scared of their memories. Scared of a society that was shunning them. Scared of trying to make a living with their emotional disabilities. I am thrilled that we could help.

More than anything else, that experience with these wonderful vets has inspired me to help bring these tapping procedures more quickly to the world. I was reminded of that at "the wall."

To one side of the wall were some bronze statutes. One of them was of three soldiers looking off in the distance. They were young men--boys, really--whose youth had left them. The look in their eyes said, "I'm fighting for my country....I think." They were racially mixed, yet unified in a way that transcends racial boundaries. One was black. One was hispanic. One was caucasian. They were comrades, bonded together within their own fear. They had only themselves to cling to. They formed a small cluster amidst a vicious war that was far bigger than they.

There is much pain in this world and only part of it has been caused by formal war. Much of the rest of it is caused by wars of another kind. I mean domestic violence, abusive behaviors and the like. You and I can help on all these levels. A peaceful world starts with individual peace--inner peace. That's where we come in. We have marvelous tools to bring this about. We have an opportunity to help bring peace to our planet. We have an opportunity to Touch the World.

Hugs, Gary

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