Flying

Simple EFT Basic Recipe collapses phobias regarding ladders, flying and cats.

EFt Tapping Outdated ImageNote: This is one of 3,000 articles written prior to the updated Gold Standard (Official) EFT Tapping Tutorial™.  It provides practical uses for EFT Tapping and most EFT'ers should find it very helpful.  However, if your benefits are temporary or a more in-depth approach is needed, you are urged to (1) consult The Gold Standard EFT Tapping Tutorial, (2) Explore our newest advancement, Optimal EFT, by reading our free e-book, The Unseen Therapist, and/or (3) get help from a Certified EFT Practitioner.  

This article is for EFT Newcomers that doubt the potential in simply applying The EFT Basic Recipe to the phobic type fears that limit the lives of so many. Andre Fillion of Canada applies the Basic Recipe to phobias in 3 different cases and reports on the impressive results in this article. Please note that some phobias are so complex that they require more EFT sophistication than just the Basic Recipe. Nonetheless, as you will see, The Basic Recipe is quite versatile and often works where nothing else will.


By Andre Fillion

Dear Gary,

I'm not an EFT expert in any way, just an EFT user familiar with the Basic Recipe. Even with my limited EFT skills, I have been able to help several people with phobias and achieved magnificent results. I had intended to submit it to the EFT website a couple of months ago, but I wanted to make sure the treatment "stuck" before I sent it . . . IT HAS.

I've used EFT in my job as a mortgage broker to "unblock" emotional issues that were impeding my effectiveness and have since increased my sales and productivity by over 200%. I've helped friends overcome severe phobias like heights, flying, snakes, spiders, cats and ladders. It takes only seconds (or minutes) depending on the severity of the issue to completely eradicate it.

Fear of ladders: When I was just learning the techniques, I was trying it on my partner as well as myself. There was much rolling of eyeballs by my partner about this seemingly ridiculous "tapping nonsense" - he's a bit of a nay-sayer. You see, he's an engineer and if he can't come up with a scientific explanation for something, then he (almost) won't even acknowledge its existence.

So I put it to the test: My partner isn't afraid of anything. Well, one thing - he has never been able to get past the second or third step of a step-ladder - never - without feeling dizzy and nauseous. So with great indignation, just to prove my point, I put our extension ladder up against our house (I previously was the only one who used it), pointed to it and said "OK, climb it." He looked at me like I was insane - and a bit cruel - until I tapped on the points for him and within two minutes he was looking into our second story bedroom window. He was completely in awe. That was two years ago and his lifelong terror of heights is still gone. And I no longer have to wash the windows.

Fear of flying: A couple of days after the ladder, my partner had to take a commuter flight from our home in Ottawa to Toronto (about an hour). He's flown his whole life without fear, but never on a 20-seater propeller plane.

When he got into his seat at the front of the plane, he started to feel dizzy and nauseous because from his seat he could look out the cockpit windscreen and watch other similar planes doing their "wobbly" takeoff. He decided that he had to get off the plane, but it was too late, it had already started to taxi. He grabbed the airsick bag to be safe, and then he remembered EFT.

He hadn't really been paying attention when I was administering this "nonsense," so he just tapped on as many points as he could remember. He was sitting next to the president of his company who had no idea what he doing, but Will didn't care: it was barf, scream, panic or tap. By the time he'd finished two rounds of as much of the sequence as he could remember, he was calm, relaxed and actually began to enjoy looking out the cockpit. He had a great flight, and the same-day return flight didn't require any additional tapping and he hasn't had a problem with it since.

OK, so that's just two instances with one person, so one more case:

Fear of cats: We had friends to the house for dinner several months ago and one of our friends brought a date whom we'd never met. They arrived, settled into the living room and I was in the next room pouring wine when I heard a scream (I thought it was a woman), then a slamming door. Apparently one of my cats had sauntered into the room and my friend's date panicked, screamed and bolted for the door. Apparently, he had such a severe phobia about cats that he couldn't be in the same house with one, let alone the same room.

I went out to the front step and talked to the guy; he was shaking, had tears in his eyes, was clearly very embarrassed and asked me if I would just please go back into the house and get his coat because he couldn't stay.

I sat down on the step with him and talked for a couple of minutes about his phobia, and even talking about it made him panicky. I asked if he'd be willing to try this "a bit strange" tapping treatment and assured him that whatever the outcome, nobody was going to force him to confront his fear and if it didn't work there would be no harm done and I'd be happy to go back into the house and get his coat for him.

He agreed, so I did the Basic Recipe on him and he started to feel better (his intensity went from a 9 to a 4), so I did another round and his fear almost completely vanished (down to a one). I took him out to the lawn and asked him to look into the dining room window at another of my cats (she's always sleeping on one of the dining chairs) and tell me how he felt. He looked at the cat and was amazed that he didn't start to feel anxious (he previously hadn't even been able to look at a cat on television. Cat food commercials made him flee the room).

I asked him if it would be alright if I tapped on the window to get the cat's attention, but warned him that once I did it the cat would come over to the window to investigate. He said it would be alright, so I tapped and over she came. He didn't budge. The cat jumped right up on the sill and still he didn't move. Then I asked him if he'd like to put his hand on the window and warned him that the cat would try to sniff his hand through the glass (she's not too bright). He safely "touched" the cat through the window and felt no anxiety - well, it was a 2. So I tapped him down to a zero while he continued to "touch" the cat.

Next, I asked him if he was ready to see a cat without the safety of a window separation. (Incidentally, by this time, my partner, knowing what I was doing, had brought all our guests out to the back yard so as not to make our new friend self-conscious). He said he was ready to try, so we walked back into the house. In the foyer, I asked how he was feeling and he said he was about a three or a four, so I tapped him down to a zero (this guy was easy).

I told him to tell me if he had even the slightest twinge of anxiety and assured him that we could go back outside any time (in fact, I left the front door open, so he had an immediate exit point if necessary). We slowly walked into the living room and there lying in his basket was our very gentle cat, Simon, who only eight or ten short minutes earlier, had caused him to flee the house. He looked at the cat, and the cat looked at him and he then looked at me and said, "I feel like saying 'so what, it's a cat' and I can't believe it."

I then asked him if he wanted to go a little closer (and reminded him that the front door was still wide open), and with that he walked right over to the basket and knelt down. I asked him what his intensity number was and said, "Maybe a one." I said, "Do you want me to tap it out?" He said he was fine and that he wanted to touch the cat, so he reached out and stoked Simon's back. Simon immediately rolled over, which he always does, for a tummy scratch. Our new friend immediately responded by scratching Simon's tummy. It was really beautiful to see both of them so blissful and content.

I then asked him if he wanted to hold Simon and he readily agreed. I picked Simon up to show him how to hold a cat and he practically snatched him from my arms and started stroking and cooing at the very "beast" who ten minutes ago had sent him into full blown panic.

I then told him that if he put his nose up to Simon's, the cat would kiss him. Without hesitation he touched noses with Simon and Simon licked his nose. Our new friend beamed then his eyes welled up and he looked at me in astonishment - he was so grateful that I had helped rid him of this thing that had caused him so much grief his entire life.

Still holding Simon, he walked out back to join our other guests and excitedly told them what had taken place in the previous fifteen minutes. He was no longer embarrassed or ashamed: his phobia was gone and he was relieved beyond his "wildest dreams."

After dinner, he sat in the living room over coffee with Simon snuggled in beside him on the chair and another one of my cats lying across the back of the chair above his head.

Epilogue:

After that evening my friend's date and I became quite good friends. I gave him a copy of the Gary's DVDs and he's now talking EFT up to anyone who will listen. He's even held a sort of informal "seminar" at his office and given copies of the DVDs to his way-too-stressed-out law partners and other staff and has observed a noticeable calm that has come over the whole firm.

Incidentally, he called me a couple of weeks after the dinner party to ask me to go with him to the animal shelter to get a cat. That was three months ago, and now he has three cats and they all sleep on his bed with him: one at his side, one at his feet and one on his pillow above his head. Absolutely remarkable.

There's no denying that EFT works. How it works is almost irrelevant; the relevant thing is that it does.

Andre Fillion

 

 

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