Using EFT

Benefits of using EFT in a cardiac group

EFt Tapping Outdated ImageNote: This is one of 3,000 articles written prior to the updated Gold Standard (Official) EFT Tapping Tutorial™.  It provides practical uses for EFT Tapping and most EFT'ers should find it very helpful.  However, if your benefits are temporary or a more in-depth approach is needed, you are urged to explore our newest advancement, Optimal EFT, by reading our free e-book, The Unseen Therapist, and/or (3) get help from a Certified EFT Practitioner.  

I've heard many reports over the years about the benefits of group tapping. The focused energies, it seems, appear to have an expanding effect on the participants. Marilyn Deak, PhD gives us some tangible examples of these benefits from her cardiac support group.

By Marilyn Deak, PhD

Dear Gary,

I have had the privilege of introducing EFT to the cardiac support group that I attend. The use of EFT in the group setting has offered some special benefits, and has been very useful for the participants.

Both individual and group therapy uses EFT as a tool to enhance healing within the session, and as a tool that patients/clients carry with them to use in their daily efforts to keep life manageable and to continue their healing. In the group setting the power of EFT seems to be strengthened by:

1) The focused energy of the entire group tapping for one person's problem seems to magnify the energy available for the healing process. For example, Ellen had been walking with a cane for about a year, and her ability to walk was deteriorating. Ellen identified for us the physiological problem, and the group tapped for "Even though the messages from Ellen's brain aren't reaching her right calf muscle, she deeply and profoundly loves and accepts herself", and "Even though the blood flow to Ellen's feet is insufficient......". Ellen reported feeling energy moving in her leg during the tapping, and at the end of the session, her leg was feeling "more relaxed and the nerves seemed less uptight." She continued tapping on her own, and within four days she was walking without a cane and has continued to improve.

2) We find that group processing at the end of the session helps members integrate the EFT healing, and broaden the cognitive shifts. The group tapped with Amy for her fear of a recurrence of her illness. "Even though I'm terrified of a relapse, .......", "Even though I'm afraid this cold is the beginning of another hospital stay, ....". After several rounds of tapping, group members shared their own health fears, and shifts they experienced from the tapping. They talked about learning to see themselves as individuals, separate from their physical challenges, the lessons they had learned from the process of meeting illness head on, and that life goes on. As we talked, Amy continued to relax, and to recognize a path going forward.

3) Working in the group setting offers Borrowed Benefits, and after tapping for Amy's fears, John reported his neck pain had disappeared.

4) We have been finding that group members often support each other between sessions, encouraging each other to 'TAP!'. This seems to speed up the incorporation of EFT as an every day coping tool.

5) The equality of group members, and the input from many, has allowed us to discuss questions in a way that does not seem possible in individual therapy. We have had many discussions about EFT, and particularly about the 'Set-Up' phrase. The pairing of self acceptance with recognition of the problem has been of primary interest. Many in the group have struggled with saying "I deeply and profoundly love and accept myself". As we've shared life stories about being taught that 'pride' was a sin, and that we are 'unworthy', the importance of this affirmation in our healing journey has generally been deeply felt, and for many has been a joyful awakening.

Sincerely,

Marilyn R. Deak, Ph.D.

 

 

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